Beware of Leg Lifts

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

As I’ve written in this forum before, I hate it when my body doesn’t cooperate with my lifestyle. For the past five months, my lower back has been giving me grief. The worst part is that it’s my own fault. I keep forgetting I’m a senior. Pre-pandemic, I used to frequent the gym several times a week. However, I hadn’t done so for the previous 1.5+ years since the beginning of the Covid lockdown.

My motivation to exercise alone at home is limited; my workout mode functions best when surrounded by fellow sufferers. So, my former physical agility is a tad less agile.

After receiving science’s gift to mankind, the Covid vaccine, I allowed myself a little less caution. With trepidation, I returned to the gym albeit fully masked. While on the treadmill, someone mentioned that a Pilates class was starting soon. I had never attended Pilates before, so I figured, why not?

I followed the others into an exercise room, grabbed a mat, and secured myself a spot on the floor. The revered instructor soon arrived, a tall, thin man with no visible body fat who appeared to be one-third my age and in great physical shape. He proceeded to maneuver his limbs into various positions. I, along with everyone else, mimicked him.

I was doing pretty well, I thought. I noticed that the woman next to me, who seemed closer to my age, was a real superstar. She had mentioned earlier that she did Pilates faithfully throughout the lockdown to keep herself from going insane. What can I say? Some practice Pilates and some write blogs.

After several exercises, Revered Instructor was soon supine (down on his mat lying on his back). Instantly, all class members assumed that position. After a variety of stretching machinations, R.I. lifted both his outstretched legs to a 45° angle and held them there. Superstar did the same followed by the others and, of course, by me. R.I. held that position while opening and closing his legs scissors-like. Superstar performed the same effortlessly. I, on the other hand, was groaning but determined. Finally, that particular torture ended, and I had survived. I was proud of myself.

Hey, I’ve still got what it takes, I thought smugly.

That night, I could barely move. My back was having none of my smugness. Its pain controlled me for the next five months, only releasing its grip gradually in minuscule increments.

Today, for the first time, I went on a hike in my favorite wilderness area near my retirement community. I have written about hiking in this area before. (Click here to read my blog of 3-31-20, “Out and About in the Time of Covid 19.”)

I have learned my lesson. As I’ve also said in this forum previously, not everything is for everyone. (Click here to read my blog of 10-18-21, “Not Everything is Everyone’s Thing.”) The “Supine Leg Raise”/hold at 45° is definitely not for me! Fortunately, my brain and fingers still work, so at least I can write, which I love. When one passion goes sideways, what is your “at least” option? We all have one. You may have to dig deep to find it, but it’s there.

Photo credit: mikecogh on VisualHunt

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SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY: LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

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Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, successful aging

Don’t Let a Little Rain Stop You

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Here we are in the middle of winter which brings with it the coldest iterations of H2O. Brrr, we crank up the heaters and pull out turtlenecks, long underwear, gloves, fur lined boots, and extra blankets.

I’ve heard it said that when it rains in New York, people get wet, but when it rains in California people die. East Coast folks usually don’t let a little rain or even snow stop them. We Californians, on the other hand, hole up inside at such weather changes. I, having lived in the “Golden State” since toddlerhood, am among the guilty.

Covid 19 with its new Omicron variant has caused so many to isolate. Now, cold weather just ramps up that choice. Staying at home indoors becomes a habit which is hard to break. We become listless and depressed with such an agoraphobic lifestyle.

When too many days, weeks, or months are less than optimum, many of us can’t seem to adapt. It is disturbing when the status quo slips away. We like our comfort zone which is predictable and safe. The reality, however, is that nothing ever stays the same. Life is always changing.

All seasons have their delight. Winter is beautiful if you’re bundled up and comfortable. Skiers know this and frolic in the snow. Warm and toasty in their ski pants and parkas, they slalom down the mountain, skis parallel for speed or in snowplow position when brakes are needed.

The rider in this photo has turned a power mobility scooter into an all-weather vehicle. We can all do something similar to suit our own particular style.

Those who roll or ski with the punches seem to make it through life easier than those who are rigid and fight against change. Flexibility is the key. Tree branches bend in turbulent winds. Structures such as houses are destroyed.

Exchange the cloak of rigidity for a rain cloak. Then, grab an umbrella and go out and about although there’s a shower outside, even if it’s just to your car to drive to another destination. Enjoy nature regardless of its inclemency. Find the beauty in every season, and make it work for you. You will be uplifted and the better for it.

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SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY: LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

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Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, successful aging

Holiday Time with Friends vs. Relatives

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

We’ve all heard the expression which dates back to the 12th century: “Blood is thicker than water.” It means that you can always trust and expect loyalty from blood relatives, but not from outsiders. We’ve also heard the polar opposite saying first coined by Harper Lee of “To Kill a Mockingbird” fame that goes something like: “You can choose your friends but not your family.” This means that we pick those we like and feel comfortable with as friends, but we are always bound to blood family no matter how deceitful, duplicitous, or hurtful they may be to us. Occasionally, some rare few can fill both roles.

At this time of year where so many major holidays converge, it’s traditional to gather with family members around the dinner table featuring roasted turkey or goose with all the trimmings. Although the stereotypical event is portrayed in the media as a happy, joyful happening, that’s not always the case.

Maybe the holiday breaking-of-bread includes contrary Grandpa Morris, Great Aunt Lillian whose stories stretch on interminably, Uncle Joe who always tells those off-color jokes that make everyone uncomfortable, perennially pissed-off cousin Ethel, socially inappropriate nephew Sam, or the ever fighting and whinny grandkiddies. Perhaps your daughter/son-in-law manages once again to make that passive-aggressive comment that leaves you reeling. Possibly your own dear progeny devote too much time trying to pry more bucks out of you.

Holidays are artificially created, celebratory days or weeks. Dig a little deeper and you may find commercial interests lurking with their own version of prying more bucks out of you. Yes, from the point of view of those having no family members at all or any nearby with whom to spend the holidays, they may feel always on the outside looking in at a world they can’t enter.

Humans experience a sense of warmth and contentment spending time with people who make them feel valued and welcome. Friends may fill that role far better than relatives. If you fall into the category of nose-pressed-against-the-glass at holiday season, don’t forget that those with family members most likely have some relatives they’d never choose as friends.

Have a happy holiday season however you spend it and with whomever you celebrate!

Photo credit: Sirelroka on Visualhunt

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SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY:  LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog “in its entirety” to anyone who might be interested, and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

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Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, successful aging

Dominating the Conversation

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

Certain larger-than-life types always seem to insert themselves into the center of attention. They get away with it as others are too polite to confront them or don’t want to make a spectacle and ruin the occasion. In social situations, however, everyone should be given the opportunity to shine.

Have you ever been with a group of people where one dominates the conversation? Maybe you’re that person. FYI: That gets old very fast. There’s just a finite amount of floor time, and each one deserves an approximately equal amount of it. When the aggressive personality steals more than their share, that means that the retiring personality sacrifices a portion of theirs. Although it may appear that the latter is listening with rapt attention to the thief, don’t be fooled. They are most likely burning with indignation at having been upstaged yet again.

If you are hogging the limelight, remember that it’s not all about you. You may think your particular story is absolutely fascinating as you wax on and on and on, but the truth is that it becomes far less so the longer you jabber, spilling into someone else’s time allotment.

Certainly tell your story, but learn to edit it toward brevity. I’ll give you an example of a run-on tale to which I was subjected by someone I met many years ago during a casual encounter who didn’t know the art of shutting up as his overly detailed chatter dragged out. I don’t remember the particulars of the story, but the gist of his delivery went something like this:

So, she said, blah blah blah.
Then, I said, blah blah blah.
Then, she said, blah blah blah.
Then, I said, “Oh.”

That last line did it for me. It was totally unnecessary as was much of his content. I politely but swiftly took my leave, being careful not to return to where he was holding court.

Are listeners decamping from your too long, too self-centered stories? If you want them to come back, practice the mechanics of the latest boon to science toward the betterment of our lives: the DNA altering CRISPR gene editing technology: snip snip snip.

Photo Credit: LJNovaScotia from Pixabay 

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SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY: LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

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Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, successful aging

Completion of Life

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

Last month, I attended a meeting of the “Death Café.” The idea originated in 2004 in Switzerland, with the present day model beginning seven years later. Death Cafés have been held all over the world in 66 countries. They enable people to learn about and become familiar with the completion of life. Attendees can discuss their thoughts, their experiences with a loved one, their questions, their fears, and so on. (I’ve written on the subject of death in this forum before. Click here and scroll down to read my blog of 2-4-17 titled, “Your Remains.”)

The meeting started with everyone taking turns discussing why they were there. Some told personal stories of their own illnesses. Some shared anecdotes about their spouse or someone else close to them. Others joked about the subject, maybe to relieve their own discomfort. With a topic so seemingly gloomy, it was strange to see people laugh. When it was my turn,, I said that I did not have any serious, medical conditions or life-threatening illnesses, but that I had thought about death and wanted to learn more about how to handle it and how to help my children deal with it when my time came.

One woman–let’s call her Evelyn–introduced herself and told us that she would be dying in a few weeks. She named a specific date and time. When she stated her name, I realized that I knew her as one of my blog followers. She has periodically responded to my postings with deep and insightful comments.

Evelyn went on to explain that she has incurable brain cancer, and that she has chosen to legally end her life following the protocol of the current law in California where she and I live. The California End of Life Option Act became law in 2016. It allows mentally capable, terminally ill adults who are California residents to obtain lethal drugs from a doctor to self-administer if they qualify. Currently, ten states and the District of Columbia allow it.

I learned that one who has made this decision should carry it out while they are still able to ingest the pills themselves, as no one else is allowed to assist them in doing so. If the subject deteriorates to the point of not being able to take the medication on their own, then medical aid in dying cannot proceed. Evelyn has gotten full approval from her doctor and has been given the pills which she has in a box at her home. The law requires two witnesses to be on hand when she ingests the pills. They will remain with her until she dies, and then they will follow her instructions for disposing of her remains–in this case, the donation of her body for medical research.

Evelyn seemed content and actually ebullient with her decision. She has spent a lot of time thinking about and coming to terms with it. She did not appear depressed or upset in any way. She does not have close family members, but she has informed her friends. She has dealt with bequeathing her property. She has planned her final hours with music she wants played and text she wants read. There is nothing left to handle.

Evelyn was very willing to answer any questions and share her experiences. She appeared joyful and unburdened. Accompanied by a wave of her hand, she ended her talk to the group with, “I’ll see you on the other side.” No one was breathing; everyone was stunned, frozen to their chairs.

Our group leader explained that the appropriate term for Evelyn’s upcoming act is: “medical aid in dying” rather than “assisted suicide.” It is sometimes also called physician assisted death. A quick google search revealed the following definitions:

Assisted Suicide: A person kills him/herself with someone else’s help. 

Euthanasia: A person intentionally administers drugs to another person to end the life of the latter. Euthanasia can be voluntary or involuntary.

Medical Aid in Dying: Without the assistance of others, a person takes a lethal dose of medication obtained from a doctor for the purpose of ending their life.

As is seen in the aforementioned definitions, the difference hinges on who administers the lethal substance. Although the terms “medical aid in dying” and “assisted suicide” seem to be synonymous, the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) sees them as distinct and no longer recognizes the latter term. Euthanasia is illegal in the United States. Medical aid in dying is legal is some states but not in others.

When the meeting ended, I approached Evelyn and introduced myself.

“Oh, yes, I read your blog all the time.”

She reminded me how we had originally met some years ago. When we finished talking, I didn’t know how to end the conversation. What do you say to someone who has chosen when and how to terminate their life, and it is imminent? 

“I wish you the best on your journey,” was what came out.

Evelyn smiled and hugged me as I wiped away my tears. She was comforting me when it should have been the other way around.

Late on the eve of her chosen date, I woke up, my mind filled with Evelyn. I couldn’t go back to sleep and wanted to make some final gesture toward her. We have speech to communicate our thoughts and feelings to others. However, sometimes there are no words sufficient for the task, and we must do the best we can. I settled on sending her an email which said: Goodbye, Evelyn. I’m thinking about you. I didn’t know if she’d even read it, but at least I had reached out. The next morning, an email from her was waiting in my inbox: Goodbye, Lee Gale. I’m looking forward to crossing the rainbow bridge. By the time I read her response, she had already made that passage.

I was deeply moved by Evelyn. Could  I do such a thing in a similar circumstance? Would I do it? Dare I do it? I’m grateful that such an option exists for me, just in case.

Evelyn had chosen death on her own terms. She would be spared an agonizing or stuporous end to her life. Her decision enabled her final days to be lighthearted and content. Happy Deathday, Evelyn.

Photo credit: Brechtbug on Visualhunt.com

***

SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY:  LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

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Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, successful aging

Don’t Be a Stick-in-the-Mud

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

Last weekend in Northern California where I live, we experienced a day sandwiched by two nights of continuous, torrential rain, or as the evening news informed viewers: a bomb cyclone. That was the backdrop to what turned out to be a seesaw several hours for me starting with opening my front door in the morning to a waterfall downpour, a flooded street, and an equally inundated garage. I wadded through, got into my car, and turned the key–to silence. There was no sound of an engine turning over and no lights on my dashboard–the car was dead. I called the Auto Club (AAA) for a battery charge.

Forty-five minutes later, a serviceman arrived.

“It looks like you left your parking lights on and ran down the battery.”

“Of course I didn’t leave my lights on. They’re set to go on and off automatically.”

Then, I remembered that I had been out of town for the previous few days, and while traveling to my destination, I had come upon a stretch of road with signs advising me that headlights were required for the next four miles. It was the middle of the day–bright and sunny, and I had absolutely no idea how to turn on my headlights manually; they only come on when it’s getting dark.

I grabbed at the dial and started turning it, but I couldn’t tell if the lights had come on or not. I tried to re-position the dial where it had started, but maybe I miscalculated. Truth be told, I hate that car manufacturers make my car do my thinking for me. Just give me a knob to pull in and out when I want to turn the headlights on and off. Instead, there is a spinner with five choices indicated by tiny, indecipherable icons, all confusing. At 70 miles per hour, I was in no position to bend over and contemplate little pictures let alone figure out what they meant. It was a barren stretch of highway, and I wasn’t about to stop on the shoulder in order to consult the car manual. I drove the four miles sans headlights, hoping I wouldn’t be stopped by the Highway Patrol or kill anyone in my headlightsless state.

The serviceman jumped the battery, and the car came to life. I chose to have him install a new one anyway.

I don’t want this to happen again, I thought.

Well, I was on my way with just a slight setback. I spent the rest of the day with my children and grandchildren laughing, playing board games, and enjoying a wonderful bonding experience.

Later, after everyone left, I was on my way home after doing a few chores. It was still raining bathtubfuls, but I was in full control, or so I thought. I soon realized I was headed in the wrong direction. Instead of using a driveway to enable my correction, I noticed a vacant, unpaved, land parcel on the corner.

Hmmm, I’ll just drive through that lot which will be much easier.

The possible consequences of intense rain didn’t even factor into my  thoughts. I was a few feet onto the dirt when my tires began spinning. I put the car into reverse–more spinning. Some nearby residents saw my plight and came running to assist me as the rain pummeled them.

“What did you do, slip off the road?”

“No, I was trying to turn around. Pretty stupid, huh?”

My Good Samaritans brought wooden boards for the car’s wheels. The two of them spent about 20 minutes crouched down in the mud jamming the planks in front of my tires to aid my escape. I stepped on the gas pedal and gunned and gunned, but nothing worked. All my tires did were to dig in deeper.

The only recourse was to call AAA to be towed out. I hadn’t used the services of AAA in about a decade, and now twice in one day–gawd! The first tow truck arrived–a flat bed. With hands on hips, the driver assessed the situation and pronounced that he couldn’t do the job with his rig. He called into dispatch for the right kind of tow and left. Another 45 minutes, and now it was very dark out with no letup in the rain. Finally, a savior arrived with the right vehicle.

“What did you do, slip off the road?”

“Ah, it’s a long story.”

Savior bravely stood in the poorly lit street dressed in a neon rain suit and stopped oncoming traffic from both directions. Then, he hooked up my car to his behemoth vehicle, complete with a forbidding light panel on top, and pulled me out in under a minute. When you’ve got the right tool for the job, anything is possible.

One has several choices with a bummed out day like that. I could let it spoil my warm feelings from the time spent with my family, or I could shrug it off and accept that this too shall pass; I chose the latter. While waiting for the tow truck, I called my son who put the phone on loudspeaker so he and my grandchildren could hear my adventures. They were laughing about Grandma’s debacle, and each had an opinion to offer on the matter–more bonding.

When life hands you mud, make mud pies. That’s what the kids do.

***

SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY:  LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

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Filed under Active Seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, successful aging

Not Everything Is Everyone’s Thing

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

Did your parents want you to be a doctor, lawyer, or Indian chief (an expression popularized in the 1940s), and you wanted to be an artist (painter, actor, singer, dancer, musician, and all the rest that fall into that category)? You can substitute a similar scenario with the professions being different or you in the parental role with your own children or grandchildren.

It’s not that the adults are uncaring or insensitive. In the majority of cases, they do have their loved one’s interests at heart. However, the more traditional career choices offer a better shot at security, money, power, and other attributes that seem like they should be the most sought after endgame. Those who opt for the chancier paths might end up starving or pretty close to it.

What about the goal of self-satisfaction? Isn’t that worthwhile? Most artists wouldn’t dream of trading their preference for a tried and true but maybe boring or unstimulating lifestyle. The security they forgo for the chance to express themselves in a manner which brings them joy and fulfillment is a no-brainer. That inner creative is always striving to get out no matter how much it is thwarted.

When another human, regardless of their relationship to you, seems to be moving toward what you consider an inadvisable course but which is obviously their passion, how about offering encouragement and support rather than dismissal and put downs? The latter approach may force them to become a D, L, or IC but at what expense? They might spend the rest of their life discontented, pining for the dream they never followed, and resentful of you.

The amassing of more and more money and power is not the Holy Grail as too many believe. As long as one has enough to feed and shelter themselves, pursuing their ideal trajectory may be enough for them. Yes, the parental figure may have acquired the fancy house with all the state-of-the-art appointments and accompanying toys, but who is really more content?

Years ago, I read that the difference in happiness between someone who earns $5,000 and $50,000 per year is significant because the lower earner is without basic necessities. However, the difference in happiness between someone earning $50,000 and $50,000,000 is non-existent. The numbers may have bumped up proportionally due to inflation, but the concept remains valid.

Rejoice in your loved one’s lifestyle decision. Respect them as the person they are. Admire them for living the life that works for them.

Photo credit: mlhradio on Visualhunt.com

***

SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY:  LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

2 Comments

Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, successful aging

The Affliction of Perfection

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

So many strive to be perfect, like an antique, porcelain vase–so exquisite, so flawless. People with this affliction need to look impeccable at all times, exceed at school and employment, have a happy family, and on and on. They will go to great lengths to achieve this goal, even to the point of imperiling their own physical and mental wellbeing.

That’s a curse I’ve been fighting for decades ever since I became aware in grammar school of the requirement for perfection. For me, and I’m sure for too many others, it’s much harder to not be perfect than to be perfect. Personal perfection was drilled into my generation starting in childhood for both males and females. The paths for the different sexes was different then but is less so these days. That same pressure on children is still ongoing, just in another iteration.

I have to work at it all the time to give myself permission to be less than… or even to fail. I can be compassionate and understanding with another’s stumble while beating myself up for the same behavior. Being kind to yourself is soooo hard to do.

In some handmade Persian rugs and carpets, the weavers deliberately make a mistake. The rationale is to not offend Allah, as they believe only their God creates perfection. Deliberate flaws are also practiced by Navajo weavers. The defect allows the maker’s spirit to find its way out of the rug if it becomes trapped there during the rendering. Such behavior serves to remind the craftsmen that errors are intrinsic to human beings.

Are you afflicted with the illness of perfection? Do you berate yourself when you don’t achieve it? Do you spend days in a bad mood, often without knowing why? Are you far harder on yourself than on anyone else? Isn’t that getting old already? What can you do about it?

The reality is that we’ll probably never be able to throw off the affliction of perfection completely–it’s too ingrained. What we can strive for is to reduce the time we spend being distressed about our lesser performance. Like so many other behavior changes, it will only happen in baby steps.

Be mindful when you’re feeling that vague, down sensation. Be conscious of when it is spreading and washing over you. Explore whether the underlying cause is because you didn’t excel in a recent situation. Realize what you’re doing to yourself. Acknowledge that you want to move past it. Then, endeavor to let it go, forgive yourself, and move on.

If you practice that technique or something similar, you may find that the amount of time between the first and last steps diminishes. It will be a slow process, but keep at it. Of course, with or without using such a method, you’ll eventually get from the “bummed out stage” to the “letting-it-go” stage just as you always have. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could do so in hours rather than days?

Photo credit: Silk Road Collection on Visualhunt.com

***

SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY:  LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

10 Comments

Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, seniors, successful aging

Reduced to Tears

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

Have you ever been out and about doing your thing, and you see someone or a group of someones who move you unexpectedly and intensely? Such a situation is usually unanticipated. It might tap into something very personal for you and even reduce you to instant tears, a disconcerting feeling.

What do you do in such an event? Do you stare unabashedly as the scene unfolds? Do you look away and sneak furtive glances? Do you approach and attempt to engage the person or persons in conversation? Do you repay them in some way for “making your day”? Do you castigate them for ruining your day?

I had such a situation happen to me recently. However, I was the mover not the movee. I have an adult, developmentally disabled daughter, and we were at a local, fast-food restaurant sitting at a table on the patio eating hamburgers. My daughter, always chatty, was commenting and asking questions about everything and everyone, especially the other customers.

“What is that man eating, Mom?”

She pointed to a young man dressed in a shirt and tie sitting alone at a table next to ours.

“It looks like a hamburger, the same as we have.”

I told her that we should not disturb him and just let him enjoy his lunch. She didn’t say anymore on the matter, but she continued to stare at his fascinating cuisine.

The object of her interest finally finished eating while we were about halfway through our meal, and he got up and left. A short time later, I noticed him coming out of the restaurant. He then walked directly up to us, placed a plastic card on the table that had the name of the restaurant on it, and said, “Here, this is for you.”

I looked at the man and told him I didn’t understand. He answered, “I want you to have this. It’s for free meals the next time you come.”

I thought he might work there, but I still couldn’t fathom why he was giving us the gift card, so I questioned him further about it. He went on to explain the reason for his gift. He had been observing my daughter and me, and he was very moved by our interaction. He had a special needs sister whom he had not seen for over a year, and he missed her very much.

The man was wearing a Covid mask, but I could tell that he was holding back tears behind the face covering. We had obviously struck a chord in him, and his only way of showing appreciation and connecting with us was to buy us a gift card. I knew that the kindness on my part would be to accept his offering, which seemed to mean a lot to him.

“Thank you very much. We’ll definitely come back and use it.”

Our benefactor acted eager to leave; I think he was dismayed and embarrassed by his show of emotion. He probably never imagined that one minute he would be casually eating his lunch and the next minute he would be breaking down in public like that.

I had a similar scenario happen to me many years ago. I was at a park with a friend. He had to get something from the car, so I was just sitting on the blanket waiting for him. I noticed a man and a young child at the small creek nearby. He was holding her under her arms while he skipped her feet from stone to stone as she giggled. It was apparent that the small girl with the perky, blond ponytail was severely handicapped. My friend returned a few minutes later to find me sobbing uncontrollably. It had tapped into my role as the mother of a disabled child which I’d been managing to handle with great fortitude.

Sometimes, unplanned encounters act upon us so suddenly and with such force that we lose control. They access deep emotions that we’ve been suppressing. The surprise element hits us before we can muster our defenses, and the feelings burst forth on their own accord. It is nothing to be ashamed of. We all have profound sensibilities which we have buried and which sometimes spring to the surface despite our best efforts. View it as a blessing and not a curse; it’s okay to be human.

Photo credit: vastateparksstaff on VisualHunt

***

SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY:  LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

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Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, seniors, successful aging

Coat Hangers

This blog is written by Lee Gale Gruen to help retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors reinvent themselves in this new stage of their lives called retirement. Her blog, public lecture, and new self-help book on senior reinvention are titled: Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire. Her memoir is: Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class. Synopses of her books follow her blog below. Both books are available at Amazon.com by clicking here and here. Her website is: LeeGaleGruen.com

Now, on to my blog:

Our laws just significantly reversed course on abortion. The United States Supreme Court recently allowed to stand, pending litigation, a new law in the state of Texas restricting abortions after six weeks of pregnancy (a controversial time when a fetal heartbeat supposedly can be detected), a point when some women don’t even know they’re pregnant. That time delay as the matter slowly wends its way through the lower courts will be too slow for many women currently seeking abortions in Texas, a procedure that is time sensitive with a short expiration date.

Texas politicians used a clever trick incorporated into their law by banning state enforcement of illegal wrongdoing, instead authorizing private citizens to file civil suits against those “aiding and abetting” an abortion. Lyft and Uber, the major ride sharing companies, have announced that they will pay the legal fees of their drivers who are sued for such an act–abracadabra, from driver to aider-and-abettor while just trying to support themselves and their families.

If successful in court, plaintiffs will stand to profit by 10,000 big ones–a pretty good incentive to become tattletales. Right-to-life advocates have started the ball rolling to control the bodies of the entire United States population of fertile females.

Now in Texas and coming soon to other copycat states, friends, foes, spouses, children, parents, siblings, neighbors, strangers, or any other human residing in that fair state will be able to secure recompense from a civil court by outing an act of assisting an abortion. Websites have even been created for the right-minded to post tip-offs on potential offenders who might violate this shiny, new law. Such laws enable the proliferation of that ancient and profitable profession: bounty hunter, particularly popular 150 years ago in the Old West of our glorious country.

I wonder if such an outcome would survive the legal tests if the bodies in question belonged to men. For example, if a state passed a law that an adult male must undergo a vasectomy prior to sexual congress with a female who chooses not to become pregnant, might there be an uproar heard from the Pacific to the Atlantic as well as non-contiguous states and territories? Hey, fellas, it’s no big deal. If you eventually decide you want your own progeny, vasectomies are reversible, or you can become a bona fide daddy via artificial insemination using your own little gene carriers.

Pregnant women themselves cannot be sued under the new Texas law for seeking an abortion. However, they will be hard-pressed to find competent assistance to do so. Do these decision makers and passers-of-laws really think that their new restrictive, abortion law will prevent women from having abortions? Do they really believe that women will not turn to whatever means available to prevent delivering an unwanted child?

The truth is that woman will do what they did historically. Those few with the means will decamp to other states or countries where abortion is legal. Those many without the means will clandestinely seek abortions in unsterile conditions with locations accessed through back alley entrances and run by self-taught practitioners. Or, they might revert to the trusty, do-it-yourself method using a wire coat hanger as their medical instrument of choice. Such procedures, of course, will result in many more deaths of said rebel females. Well, maybe those oh-so-wise legislators believe that’s just collateral damage as they put all their efforts into the rights of the unborn, only to walk away from such support once that child is birthed.

Is this the first step of American women going the way of Afghani women: back into the house under the total control of men? Is that what we want to do to fifty percent of our productive population? That will not only push women into the dark ages again but our entire country as well.

This blog is most often directed to retirees, baby boomers, and seniors, a demographic rarely faced with having to seek abortions. Why should they care? Well, because, they have children and grandchildren who might be impacted.

Life is sacred. Each new birth should be cherished, nurtured, and supported. If a woman has decided she is unable or unwilling to do those things, shouldn’t she be the one to make that decision instead of some self-appointed, parental figure who “knows best”?

***

SYNOPSES OF BOOKS BY:  LEE GALE GRUEN

Reinventing Yourself in Your Retirement Years: Find Joy, Excitement, and Purpose After You Retire (self-help): Not a one-size-fits-all approach, this self-help book for retirees, those soon to retire, baby boomers, and seniors offers an individualized, detailed guide to assist readers in discovering activities and pursuits in this new stage of their lives called retirement, based on their own likes and comfort level. I learned the secret the hard way transitioning from retired probation officer to actress, author, public speaker, and blogger. Audience members at my lectures on senior reinvention requested a book on the subject. This is the result, and it contains the content of those talks and six years of posts from this blog. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

Adventures with Dad: A Father and Daughter’s Journey Through a Senior Acting Class (memoir): After retiring at age 60 from my 37-year career as a probation officer, I mistakenly enrolled in an acting class for seniors.  A few weeks later, my mother died, and I invited my grieving, 85-year-old father to come to class with me.  This is the true story of our magical journey attending that class together for three years, bonding more than ever.  I wrote the comedy scenes we performed onstage twice a year in the acting class showcases, and all six scenes are included in the book.  I eventually transitioned into the world of professional acting.  As my fledgling, second career started going uphill, my dad’s health started going downhill.  I would recount to him each of my new experiences while I sat beside his bed at the nursing home where he resided in his final years. CLICK here TO PURCHASE FROM AMAZON.COM.

***

Please forward my blog in its entirety to anyone who might be interested and post it on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. To reprint any material, contact me for permission at: gowergulch@yahoo.com. If you want to be automatically notified when I post a new blog, click on the “Follow” button in the upper right corner of this page and fill in the information. To read my other blog posts, scroll down on this page or click on “Recent Posts” or “Archives” under the Follow button. To opt out of receiving this blog, contact me at the aforementioned email address, let me know, and I’ll remove you from the list.

6 Comments

Filed under active seniors, Baby boomers, healthy aging, longevity, reinvention, retirement, senior citizens, seniors, successful aging